Difference between revisions of "Cation"

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1. A positively charged ion.<br><br>
 
1. A positively charged ion.<br><br>
  
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/img/gcsechem_58.jpg<br><br>
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http://stcolumbas.fireflycloud.net/resource.aspx?id=5310<br><br>
These are examples of positively charged [[ions]] of the left. Metal atoms lose the electron or electrons in their outer shell and become positively-charged ions. On the right are examples of negatively charged ions.<br>
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A neutral atom becomes an ion by losing an electron (cation) or gaining an electron (anion).<br><br>
Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/chemistry/classifyingmaterials/ionic_bondingrev2.shtml
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Source: http://stcolumbas.fireflycloud.net/chemistry/form-iv-chemistry/anions-and-cations<br><br>
<br><br>
 
http://iss.cet.edu/electricity/pages/images/B/b11_5.jpg<br><br>
 
This model shows a neutral sodium atom (a metal) and a positively charged sodium ion after sodium loses the one valence electron in its outer orbital.<br>
 
Source: http://iss.cet.edu/electricity/pages/g1.xml<br><br>
 

Revision as of 09:03, 10 July 2017


1. A positively charged ion.

http://stcolumbas.fireflycloud.net/resource.aspx?id=5310

A neutral atom becomes an ion by losing an electron (cation) or gaining an electron (anion).

Source: http://stcolumbas.fireflycloud.net/chemistry/form-iv-chemistry/anions-and-cations